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8 resources to get free training data for ml systems

The current technological landscape has exhibited the need for feeding Machine Learning systems with useful training data sets. Training data helps a program understand how to apply technology such as neural networks. This is to help it to learn and produce sophisticated results.

The accuracy and relevance of these sets pertaining to the ML system they are being fed into are of paramount importance, for that dictates the success of the final model. For example, if a customer service chatbot is to be created which responds courteously to user complaints and queries, its competency will be highly determined by the relevancy of the training data sets given to it.

To facilitate the quest for reliable training data sets, here is a list of resources which are available free of cost.

Kaggle

Owned by Google LLC, Kaggle is a community of data science enthusiasts who can access and contribute to its repository of code and data sets. Its members are allowed to vote and run kernel/scripts on the available datasets. The interface allows users to raise doubts and answer queries from fellow community members. Also, collaborators can be invited for direct feedback.

The training data sets uploaded on Kaggle can be sorted using filters such as usability, new and most voted among others. Users can access more than 20,000 unique data sets on the platform.

Kaggle is also popularly known among the AI and ML communities for its machine learning competitions, Kaggle kernels, public datasets platform, Kaggle learn and jobs board.

Examples of training datasets found here include Satellite Photograph Order and Manufacturing Process Failures.

Registry of Open Data on AWS

As its website displays, Amazon Web Services allows its users to share any volume of data with as many people they’d like to. A subsidiary of Amazon, it allows users to analyze and build services on top of data which has been shared on it.  The training data can be accessed by visiting the Registry for Open Data on AWS.

Each training dataset search result is accompanied by a list of examples wherein the data could be used, thus deepening the user’s understanding of the set’s capabilities.

The platform emphasizes the fact that sharing data in the cloud platform allows the community to spend more time analyzing data rather than searching for it.

Examples of training datasets found here include Landsat Images and Common Crawl Corpus.

UCI Machine Learning Repository

Run by the School of Information & Computer Science, UC Irvine, this repository contains a vast collection of ML system needs such as databases, domain theories, and data generators. Based on the type of machine learning problem, the datasets have been classified. The repository has also been observed to have some ready to use data sets which have already been cleaned.

While searching for suitable training data sets, the user can browse through titles such as default task, attribute type, and area among others. These titles allow the user to explore a variety of options regarding the type of training data sets which would suit their ML models best.

The UCI Machine Learning Repository allows users to go through the catalog in the repository along with datasets outside it.

Examples of training data sets found here include Email Spam and Wine Classification.

Microsoft Research Open Data

The purpose of this platform is to promote the collaboration of data scientists all over the world. A collaboration between multiple teams at Microsoft, it provides an opportunity for exchanging training data sets and a culture of collaboration and research.

The interface allows users to select datasets under categories such as Computer Science, Biology, Social Science, Information Science, etc. The available file types are also mentioned along with details of their licensing.

Datasets spanning from Microsoft Research to advance state of the art research under domain-specific sciences can be accessed in this platform.

GitHub.com/awesomedata/awesomepublicdatasets

GitHub is a community of software developers who apart from many things can access free datasets. Companies like Buzzfeed are also known to have uploaded data sets on federal surveillance planes, zika virus, etc. Being an open-source platform, it allows users to contribute and learn about training data sets and the ones most suitable for their AI/ML models.

Socrata Open Data

This portal contains a vast variety of data sets which can be viewed on its platform and downloaded. Users will have to sort through data which is currently valid and clean to find the most useful ones. The platform allows the data to be viewed in a tabular form. This added with its built-in visualization tools makes the training data in the platform easy to retrieve and study.

Examples of sets found in this platform include White House Staff Salaries and Workplace Fatalities by US State.

R/datasets

This subreddit is dedicated to sharing training datasets which could be of interest to multiple community members. Since these are uploaded by everyday users, the quality and consistency of the training sets could vary, but the useful ones can be easily filtered out.

Examples of training datasets found in this subreddit include New York City Property Tax Data and Jeopardy Questions.

Academic Torrents

This is basically a data aggregator in which training data from scientific papers can be accessed. The training data sets found here are in many cases massive and they can be accessed directly on the site. If the user has a BitTorrent client, they can download any available training data set immediately.

Examples of available training data sets include Enron Emails and Student Learning Factors.

Conclusion

In an age where data is arguably the world’s most valuable resource, the number of platforms which provide this is also vast. Each platform caters to its own niche within the field while also displaying commonly sought after datasets.  While the quality of training data sets could vary across the board, with the appropriate filters, users can access and download the data sets which suit their machine learning models best. If you need a custom dataset, do check us out here, share your requirements with us, and we’ll more than happy to help you out!

The need for training data in ai and ml models

Not very long ago, sometime towards the end of the first decade of the 21st century, internet users everywhere around the world began seeing fidelity tests while logging onto websites. You were shown an image of a text, with one word or usually two, and you had to type the words correctly to be able to proceed further. This was their way of identifying that you were, in fact, human, and not a line of code trying to worm its way through to extract sensitive information from said website. While it was true, this wasn’t the whole story.

Turns out, only one of the two Captcha words shown to you were part of the test, and the other was an image of a word taken from an as yet non-transcribed book. And you, along with millions of unsuspecting users worldwide, contributed to the digitization of the entire Google Books archive by 2011. Another use case of such an endeavor was to train AI in Optical Character Recognition (OCR), the result of which is today’s Google Lens, besides other products.

Do you really need millions of users to build an AI? How exactly was all this transcribed data used to make a machine understand paragraphs, lines, and individual words? And what about companies that are not as big as Google – can they dream of building their own smart bot? This article will answer all these questions by explaining the role of datasets in artificial intelligence and machine learning.

ML and AI – smart tools to build smarter computers

In our efforts to make computers intelligent – teach them to find answers to problems without being explicitly programmed for every single need – we had to learn new computational techniques. They were already well endowed with multiple superhuman abilities: computers were superior calculators, so we taught them how to do math; we taught them language, and they were able to spell and even say “dog”; they were huge reservoirs of memory, hence we used them to store gigabytes of documents, pictures, and video; we created GPUs and they let us manipulate visual graphics in games and movies. What we wanted now was for the computer to help us spot a dog in a picture full of animals, go through its memory to identify and label the particular breed among thousands of possibilities, and finally morph the dog to give it the head of a lion that I captured on my last safari. This isn’t an exaggerated reality – FaceApp today shows you an older version of yourself by going through more or less the same steps.

For this, we needed to develop better programs that would let them learn how to find answers and not just be glorified calculators – the beginning of artificial intelligence. This need gave rise to several models in Machine Learning, which can be understood as tools that enhanced computers into thinking systems (loosely).

Machine Learning Models

Machine Learning is a field which explores the development of algorithms that can learn from data and then use that learning to predict outcomes. There are primarily three categories that ML models are divided into:

Supervised Learning

These algorithms are provided data as example inputs and desired outputs. The goal is to generate a function that maps the inputs to outputs with the most optimal settings that result in the highest accuracy.

Unsupervised Learning

There are no desired outputs. The model is programmed to identify its own structure in the given input data.

Reinforcement Learning

The algorithm is given a goal or target condition to meet and it is left to its devices to learn by trial and error. It uses past results to inform itself about both optimal and detrimental paths and charts the best path to the desired endgame result.

In each of these philosophies, the algorithm is designed for a generic learning process and exposed to data or a problem. In essence, the written program only teaches a wholesome approach to the problem and the algorithm learns the best way to solve it.

Based on the kind of problem-solving approach, we have the following major machine learning models being used today:

  • Regression
    These are statistical models applicable to numeric data to find out a relationship between the given input and desired output. They fall under supervised machine learning. The model tries to find coefficients that best fit the relationship between the two varying conditions. Success is defined by having as little noise and redundancy in the output as possible.

    Examples: Linear regression, polynomial regression, etc.
  • Classification
    These models predict or explain one outcome among a few possible class values. They are another type of supervised ML model. Essentially, they classify the given data as belonging to one type or ending up as one output.

    Examples: Logistic regression, decision trees, random forests, etc.
  • Decision Trees and Random Forests
    A decision tree is based on numerous binary nodes with a Yes/No decision marker at each. Random forests are made of decision trees, where accurate outputs are obtained by processing multiple decision trees and results combined.
  • Naïve Bayes Classifiers
    These are a family of probabilistic classifiers that use Bayes’ theorem in the decision rule. The input features are assumed to be independent, hence the name naïve. The model is highly scalable and competitive when compared to advanced models.
  • Clustering
    Clustering models are a part of unsupervised machine learning. They are not given any desired output but identify clusters or groups based on shared characteristics. Usually, the output is verified using visualizations.

    Examples: K-means, DBSCAN, mean shift clustering, etc.
  • Dimensionality Reduction
    In these models, the algorithm identifies the least important data from the given set. Based on the required output criteria, some information is labeled redundant or unimportant for the desired analysis. For huge datasets, this is an invaluable ability to have a manageable analysis size.

    Examples: Principal component analysis, t-stochastic neighbor embedding, etc.
  • Neural Networks and Deep Learning
    One of the most widely used models in AI and ML today, neural networks are designed to capture numerous patterns in the input dataset. This is achieved by imitating the neural structure of the human brain, with each node representing a neuron. Every node is given activation functions with weights that determine its interaction with its neighbors and adjusted with each calculation. The model has an input layer, hidden layers with neurons, and an output layer. It is called deep learning when many hidden layers are encapsulating a wide variety of architectures that can be implemented. ML using deep neural networks requires a lot of data and high computational power. The results are without a doubt the most accurate, and they have been very successful in processing images, language, audio, and videos.

There is no single ML model that offers solutions to all AI requirements. Each problem has its own distinct challenges, and knowledge of the workings behind each model is mandatory to be able to use them efficiently. For example, regression models are best suited for forecasting data and for risk assessment. Clustering modes in handwriting recognition and image recognition, decision trees to understand patterns and identify disease trends, naïve Bayes classifier for sentiment analysis, ranking websites and documents, deep neural networks models in computer vision, natural language processing, and financial markets, etc. are more such use cases.

The need for training data in ML models

Any machine learning model that we choose needs data to train its algorithm on. Without training data, all the algorithm understands is how to approach the given problem, and without proper calibration, so to speak, the results won’t be accurate enough. Before training, the model is just a theorist, without the fine-tuning to its settings necessary to start working as a usable tool.

While using datasets to teach the model, training data needs to be of a large size and high quality. All of AI’s learning happens only through this data. So it makes sense to have as big a dataset as is required to include variety, subtlety, and nuance that makes the model viable for practical use. Simple models designed to solve straight-forward problems might not require a humongous dataset, but most deep learning algorithms have their architecture coded to facilitate a deep simulation of real-world features.

The other major factor to consider while building or using training data is the quality of labeling or annotation. If you’re trying to teach a bot to speak the human language or write in it, it’s not just enough to have millions of lines of dialogue or script. What really makes the difference is readability, accurate meaning, effective use of language, recall, etc. Similarly, if you are building a system to identify emotion from facial images, the training data needs to have high accuracy in labeling corners of eyes and eyebrows, edges of the mouth, the tip of the nose and textures for facial muscles. High-quality training data also makes it faster to train your model accurately. Required volumes can be significantly reduced, saving time, effort (more on this shortly) and money.

Datasets are also used to test the results of training. Model predictions are compared to testing data values to determine the accuracy achieved until then. Datasets are quite central to building AI – your model is only as good as the quality of your training data.

How to build datasets?

With heavy requirements in quantity and quality, it is clear that getting your hands on reliable datasets is not an easy task. You need bespoke datasets that match your exact requirements. The best training data is tailored for the complexity of the ask as opposed to being the best-fit choice from a list of options. Being able to build a completely adaptive and curated dataset is invaluable for businesses developing artificial intelligence.

On the contrary, having a repository of several generic datasets is more beneficial for a business selling training data. There are also plenty of open-source datasets available online for different categories of training data. MNIST, ImageNet, CIFAR provide images. For text datasets, one can use WordNet, WikiText, Yelp Open Dataset, etc. Datasets for facial images, videos, sentiment analysis, graphs and networks, speech, music, and even government stats are all easily found on the web.

Another option to build datasets is to scrape websites. For example, one can take customer reviews off e-commerce websites to train classification models for sentiment analysis use cases. Images can be downloaded en masse as well. Such data needs further processing before it can be used to train ML models. You will have to clean this data to remove duplicates, or to identify unrelated or poor-quality data.

Irrespective of the method of procurement, a vigilant developer is always likely to place their bets on something personalized for their product that can address specific needs. The most ideal solutions are those that are painstakingly built from scratch with high levels of precision and accuracy with the ability to scale. The last bit cannot be underestimated – AI and ML have an equally important volume side to their success conditions.

Coming back to Google, what are they doing lately with their ingenious crowd-sourcing model? We don’t see a lot of captcha text anymore. As fidelity tests, web users are now annotating images to identify patterns and symbols. All the traffic lights, trucks, buses and road crossings that you mark today are innocuously building training data to develop their latest tech for self-driving cars. The question is, what’s next for AI and how can we leverage human effort that is central to realizing machine intelligence through training datasets?

8 common myths about machine learning

Artificial Intelligence and the idea of it has always been around be it research or sci-fi movies. But the advances in AI wasn’t drastic until recently. Guess what changed? The focus moved from vast AI to components of AI such as machine learning, natural language processing, and other technologies that make it possible.

Learning models which form the core of AI started being used extensively. This shift of focus to Machine Learning gave rise to various libraries and tools which make ML models easily accessible. Here are some common myths surrounding Machine Learning:

Machine Learning, Deep Learning, Artificial Intelligence are all the same

In a recent survey by TechTalks, it was discovered that more than 30% of the companies wrongly claim to use Advance Machine Learning models to improve their operations and automate the process. Most people use AI and ML synonymously. How different are AI, ML and Deep Learning?

Machine Learning is a branch of Artificial Intelligence which has learning algorithms powered by annotated data which learn through experiences. There are primarily two types of learning algorithms.

Supervised Learning algorithms draw patterns based on the input and output values of the datasets. It starts predicting the outputs from the training data sets with possible input and output values.

Unsupervised learning models look at all the data fed into the model and find out patterns in the data. It uses unstructured and unlabeled data sets.

Artificial Intelligence, on the other hand, is a very broad area of Computer Science, where robust engineering and technological advances are used to build systems that need minimal or no human intelligence. Everything from the auto-player in video games to predictive analytics used to forecast sales fall under the same roof using some Machine Learning algorithms

Deep Learning uses a set of ML algorithms to model abstraction in data sets with system architecture. It is an approach used to build and train neural networks.

All data is useful to train a Machine Learning model

Another common myth around Machine learning models is that all the data is useful to improve the outputs of the model. The raw data is never clean and representative of the outputs.

To train the Machine Learning models to learn the accurate outputs expected, data sets need to be labeled with relevance. Irrelevant data needs to be removed.

The accuracy of the model is directly correlated to the quality of the data sets. The quality of the trained data sets results in better accuracy rather than a huge amount of raw/unlabelled data.

Building an ML system is easy with unsupervised learning and ‘Black Box Models’

The most business decision will require very specific evaluation, to make strategic data-driven decisions. Unsupervised and ‘Black Box’ models use algorithms randomly and highlight data patterns making it biased towards patterns which aren’t relevant.

The usability and relevance of these patterns to the objective the business the focus is on are a lot less when these models are used. Black box systems do not reveal what patterns they have used to arrive at certain conclusions. Supervised or Reinforcement learning trained with curated, labeled data sets can surgically investigate the data and give us the desired outputs.

ML will replace people and kill jobs

The usual notion around any advanced technology is that it will replace people and make people jobless. According to Erik Brynjolfsson and Daniel Rock, with MIT, and TomMitchell of Carnegie Mellon University, ML will kill the automated or painfully redundant tasks, not jobs.

Humans will spend more time on decision making jobs rather than repetitive tasks which ML can take care of. The job market will see a significant reduction in repetitive job roles but the wave of ML, AI will create a new sector of jobs to handle the data, train it and derive outcomes based on the ML systems.

Machine Learning can only discover correlations between objects and not causal relationships

A common perception of Machine Learning is that it discovers easy correlations and not insightful outputs. Machine Learning used in conjunction with thematic roles and relationship models of NLP will provide rich insights. Contrary to common belief, ML can identify causal relationships. This is commonly used to try out different use cases and observing the consequences of the cases.

Machine learning can work without human intervention

Most decisions from the ML models will need human intelligence and intervention. For examples, an airlines company may adopt ML algorithms to get better insights and influence best ticket prices. Data sets are constantly updated and complex algorithms may be run on it.

But, to decide the price of a flight by the system itself has a lot of loopholes, the company will hire an analyst who will analyze the data and sets prices with the help of models and their analytical skills, not just relying on the model alone.

The reasoning behind the decision making is still a human intelligence one. Complete control should not be rested on models for optimal results.

Machine Learning is the same as Data mining

Data mining is a technique to examine databases and discover the properties of data sets. The reasons its often confused is because Data Analytics uses these data sets using data visualization techniques. Whereas, Machine Learning is a subfield which uses curated data sets to teach systems the desired outputs and make predictions.

There is similarity when unsupervised learning Ml models use datasets to draw insights from them, which is precisely what data mining does. Machine Learning can be used for data mining.

The common confusion between the two arises due to a new term being used extensively, Data Science. Most Data mining-focused professionals and companies are leaning towards using Data science and analytics now causing more confusion.

ML takes a few months to master and is simple

To be an efficient ML Engineer, a lot of experience and research is needed. Contrary to the hype, ML is more than importing existing libraries in languages and using Tensor Flow or Keras. These can be used with minimal training but takes an experienced hand to provide accuracy.

A lot of intense Machine Learning focussed products require intense research on topics and even coming up with approaches using methods that are in discussion at a university or research level. Already existing libraries solve very generic problems people are trying to solve and not really insightful data. A deeper understanding of algorithms is needed to create an accurate model with an improved f1(accuracy) score.

To sum up, there is an overlap of concepts and models in Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, Data Science and Deep Learning. However, the goal and science of the subfields vastly vary. To build completely automated AI systems, all the fields become crucial and play a distinct role.

Understanding the difference between AI, ML & NLP models

Technology has revolutionized our lives and is constantly changing and progressing. The most flourishing technologies include Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Natural Language Processing, and Deep Learning. These are the most trending technologies growing at a fast pace and are today’s leading-edge technologies.

These terms are generally used together in some contexts but do not mean the same and are related to each other in some or the other way. ML is one of the leading areas of AI which allows computers to learn by themselves and NLP is a branch of AI.

What is Artificial Intelligence?

Artificial refers to something not real and Intelligence stands for the ability of understanding, thinking, creating and logically figuring out things. These two terms together can be used to define something which is not real yet intelligent.

AI is a field of computer science that emphasizes on making intelligent machines to perform tasks commonly associated with intelligent beings. It basically deals with intelligence exhibited by software and machines.

While we have only recently begun making meaningful strides in AI, its application has encompassed a wide spread of areas and impressive use-cases. AI finds application in very many fields, from assisting cameras, recognizing landscapes, and enhancing picture quality to use-cases as diverse and distinct as self-driving cars, autonomous robotics, virtual reality, surveillance, finance, and health industries.

History of AI

The first work towards AI was carried out in 1943 with the evolution of Artificial Neurons. In 1950, Turing test was conducted by Alan Turing that can check the machine’s ability to exhibit intelligence.

The first chatbot was developed in 1966 and was named ELIZA followed by the development of the first smart robot, WABOT-1. The first AI vacuum cleaner, ROOMBA was introduced in the year 2002. Finally, AI entered the world of business with companies like Facebook and Twitter using it.

Google’s Android app “Google Now”, launched in the year 2012 was again an AI application. The most recent wonder of AI is “the Project Debater” from IBM. AI has currently reached a remarkable position

The areas of application of AI include

  • Chat-bots – An ever-present agent ready to listen to your needs complaints and thoughts and respond appropriately and automatically in a timely fashion is an asset that finds application in many places — virtual agents, friendly therapists, automated agents for companies, and more.
  • Self-Driving Cars: Computer Vision is the fundamental technology behind developing autonomous vehicles. Most leading car manufacturers in the world are reaping the benefits of investing in artificial intelligence for developing on-road versions of hands-free technology.
  • Computer Vision: Computer Vision is the process of computer systems and robots responding to visual inputs — most commonly images and videos.
  • Facial Recognition: AI helps you detect faces, identify faces by name, understand emotion, recognize complexion and that’s not the end of it.

What is Machine Learning?

One of the major applications of Artificial Intelligence is machine learning. ML is not a sub-domain of AI but can be generally termed as a sub-field of AI. The field of machine learning is concerned with the question of how to construct computer programs that automatically improve with experience.

Implementing an ML model requires a lot of data known as training data which is fed into the model and based on this data, the machine learns to perform several tasks. This data could be anything such as text, images, audio, etc…

 Machine learning draws on concepts and results from many fields, including statistics, artificial intelligence, philosophy, information theory, biology, cognitive science, computational complexity and control theory. ML itself is a self-learning algorithm. The different algorithms of ML include Decision Trees, Neural Networks, SEO, Candidate Elimination, Find-S, etc.

History of Machine Learning

The roots of ML lie way back in the 17th century with the introduction of Mechanical Adder and Mechanical System for Statistical Calculations. Turing Test conducted in 1950 was again a turning point in the field of ML.

The most important feature of ML is “Self-Learning”. The first computer learning program was written by Arthur Samuel for the game of checkers followed by the designing of perceptron (neural network). “The Nearest Neighbor” algorithm was written for pattern recognition.

Finally, the introduction of adaptive learning was introduced in the early 2000s which is currently progressing rapidly with Deep Learning is one of its best examples.

Different types of machine learning approaches are:

Supervised Learning uses training data which is correctly labeled to teach relationships between given input variables and the preferred output.

Unsupervised Learning doesn’t have a training data set but can be used to detect repetitive patterns and styles.

Reinforcement Learning encourages trial-and-error learning by rewarding and punishing respectively for preferred and undesired results.

ML has several applications in various fields such as

  • Customer Service: ML is revolutionizing customer service, catering to customers by providing tailored individual resolutions as well as enhancing the human service agent capability through profiling and suggesting proven solutions. 
  • HealthCare: The use of different sensors and devices use data to access a patient’s health status in real-time.
  • Financial Services: To get the key insights into financial data and to prevent financial frauds.
  • Sales and Marketing: This majorly includes digital marketing, which is currently an emerging field, uses several machine learning algorithms to enhance the purchases and to enhance the ideal buyer journey.

What is Natural Language Processing?

Natural Language Processing is an AI method of communicating with an intelligent system using a natural language.

Natural Language Processing (NLP) and its variants Natural Language Understanding (NLU) and Natural Language Generation (NLG) are processes which teach human language to computers. They can then use their understanding of our language to interact with us without the need for a machine language intermediary.

History of NLP

NLP was introduced mainly for machine translation. In the early 1950s attempts were made to automate language translation. The growth of NLP started during the early ’90s which involved the direct application of statistical methods to NLP itself. In 2006, more advancement took place with the launch of IBM’s Watson, an AI system which is capable of answering questions posed in natural language. The invention of Siri’s speech recognition in the field of NLP’s research and development is booming.

Few Applications of NLP include

  • Sentiment Analysis – Majorly helps in monitoring Social Media
  • Speech Recognition – The ability of a computer to listen to a human voice, analyze and respond.
  • Text Classification – Text classification is used to assign tags to text according to the content.
  • Grammar Correction – Used by software like MS-Word for spell-checking.

What is Deep Learning?

The term “Deep Learning” was first coined in 2006. Deep Learning is a field of machine learning where algorithms are motivated by artificial neural networks (ANN). It is an AI function that acts lie a human brain for processing large data-sets. A different set of patterns are created which are used for decision making.

The motive of introducing Deep Learning is to move Machine Learning closer to its main aim. Cat Experiment conducted in 2012 figured out the difficulties of Unsupervised Learning. Deep learning uses “Supervised Learning” where a neural network is trained using “Unsupervised Learning”.

Taking inspiration from the latest research in human cognition and functioning of the brain, neural network algorithms were developed which used several ‘nodes’ that process information like how neurons do. These networks have multiple layers of nodes (deep nodes and surface nodes) for different complexities, hence the term deep learning. The different activation functions used in Deep Learning include linear, sigmoid, tanh, etc.…

History of Deep Learning

The history of Deep Learning includes the introduction of “The Back-Propagation” algorithm, which was introduced in 1974, used for enhancing prediction accuracy in ML.  Recurrent Neural Network was introduced in 1986 which takes a series of inputs with no predefined limit, followed by the introduction of Bidirectional Recurrent Neural Network in 1997.  In 2009 Salakhutdinov & Hinton introduced Deep Boltzmann Machines. In the year 2012, Geoffrey Hinton introduced Dropout, an efficient way of training neural networks

Applications of Deep Learning are

  • Text and Character generation – Natural Language Generation.
  • Automatic Machine Translation – Automatic translation of text and images.
  • Facial Recognition: Computer Vision helps you detect faces, identify faces by name, understand emotion, recognize complexion and that’s not the end of it.
  • Robotics: Deep learning has also been found to be effective at handling multi-modal data generated in robotic sensing applications.

Key Differences between AI, ML, and NLP

Artificial intelligence (AI) is closely related to making machines intelligent and make them perform human tasks. Any object turning smart for example, washing machine, cars, refrigerator, television becomes an artificially intelligent object. Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence are the terms often used together but aren’t the same.

ML is an application of AI. Machine Learning is basically the ability of a system to learn by itself without being explicitly programmed. Deep Learning is a part of Machine Learning which is applied to larger data-sets and based on ANN (Artificial Neural Networks).

The main technology used in NLP (Natural Language Processing) which mainly focuses on teaching natural/human language to computers. NLP is again a part of AI and sometimes overlaps with ML to perform tasks. DL is the same as ML or an extended version of ML and both are fields of AI. NLP is a part of AI which overlaps with ML & DL.

Computer vision and image annotation | Blog | Bridged

Understanding the Machine Learning technology that is propelling the future

Any computing system fundamentally works on the basic concepts of input and output. Whether it is a rudimentary calculator, our all-requirements-met smartphone, a NASA supercomputer predicting the effects of events occurring thousands of light-years away, or a robot-like J.A.R.V.I.S. helping us defend the planet, it’s always a response to a stimulus — much like how we humans operate — and the algorithms which we create teach the process for the same. The specifications of the processing tools determine how accurate, quick, and advanced the output information can be.

Computer Vision is the process of computer systems and robots responding to visual inputs — most commonly images and videos. To put it in a very simple manner, computer vision advances the input (output) steps by reading (reporting) information at the same visual level as a person and therefore removing the need for translation into machine language (vice versa). Naturally, computer vision techniques have the potential for a higher level of understanding and application in the human world.

While computer vision techniques have been around since the 1960s, it wasn’t till recently that they picked up the pace to become very powerful tools. Advancements in Machine Learning, as well as increasingly capable storage and computational tools, have enabled the rise in the stock of Computer Vision methods.

What follows is also an explanation of how Artificial Intelligence is born.

Understanding Images

Machines interpret images as a collection of individual pixels, with each colored pixel being a combination of three different numbers. The total number of pixels is called the image resolution, and higher resolutions become bigger sizes (storage size). Any algorithm which tries to process images needs to be capable of crunching large numbers, which is why the progress in this field is tangential to advancement in computational ability.

Understanding images | Blog | Bridged.co

The building blocks of Computer Vision are the following two:

Object Detection

Object Identification

As is evident from the names, they stand for figuring out distinct objects in images (Detection) and recognizing objects with specific names (Identification).

These techniques are implemented through several methods, with algorithms of increasing complexity providing increasingly advanced results.

Training Data

The previous section explains the architecture behind a computer’s understanding of images. Before a computer can perform the required output function, it is trained to predict such results based on data that is known to be relevant and at the same time accurate — this is called Training Data. An algorithm is a set of guidelines that defines the process by which a computer achieves the output — the closer the output is to the expected result, the better the algorithm. This training forms what is called Machine Learning.

This article is not going to delve into the details of Machine Learning (or Deep Learning, Neural Networks, etc.) algorithms and tools — basically, they are the programming techniques that work through the Training Data. Rather, we will proceed now to elaborate on the tools that are used to prepare the Training Data required for such an algorithm to feed on — this is where Bridged’s expertise comes into the picture.

Image Annotation

For a computer to understand images, the training data needs to be labeled and presented in a language that the computer would eventually learn and implement by itself — thus becoming artificially intelligent.

The labeling methods used to generate usable training data are called Annotation techniques, or for Computer Vision, Image Annotation. Each of these methods uses a different type of labeling, usable for various end-goals.

At Bridged AI, as reliable players for artificial intelligence and machine learning training data, we offer a range of image annotation services, few of which are listed below:

2D/3D Bounding Boxes

2D and 3d bounding boxes | Blog | Bridged.co

Drawing rectangles or cuboids around objects in an image and labeling them to different classes.

Point Annotation

Point annotation | Blog | Bridged.co

Marking points of interest in an object to define its identifiable features.

Line Annotation

Line annotation | Blog | Bridged.co

Drawing lines over objects and assigning a class to them.

Polygonal Annotation

Polygonal annotation | Blog | Bridged.co

Drawing polygonal boundaries around objects and class-labeling them accordingly.

Semantic Segmentation

Semantic segmentation | blog | Bridged.co

Labeling images at a pixel level for a greater understanding and classification of objects.

Video Annotation

Video annotation | blog | Bridged.co

Object tracking through multiple frames to estimate both spatial and temporal quantities.

Applications of Computer Vision

It would not be an exaggeration to say computer vision is driving modern technology like no other. It finds application in very many fields — from assisting cameras, recognizing landscapes, and enhancing picture quality to use-cases as diverse and distinct as self-driving cars, autonomous robotics, virtual reality, surveillance, finance, and health industries — and they are increasing by the day.

Facial Recognition

Facial recognition | Blog | Bridged.co

Computer Vision helps you detect faces, identify faces by name, understand emotion, recognize complexion and that’s not the end of it.

The use of this powerful tool is not limited to just fancying photos. You can implement it to quickly sift through customer databases, or even for surveillance and security by identifying fraudsters.

Self-driving Cars

Self-driving cars | Blog | Bridged.co

Computer Vision is the fundamental technology behind developing autonomous vehicles. Most leading car manufacturers in the world are reaping the benefits of investing in artificial intelligence for developing on-road versions of hands-free technology.

Augmented & Virtual Reality

Augmented and virtual reality | Blog | Bridged.co

Again, Computer Vision is central to creating limitless fantasy worlds within physical boundaries and augmenting our senses.

Optical Character Recognition

An AI system can be trained through Computer Vision to identify and read text from images and images of documents and use it for faster processing, filtering, and on-boarding.

Artificial Intelligence is the leading technology of the 21st century. While doomsday conspirators cry themselves hoarse about the potential destruction of the human race at the hands of AI robots, Bridged.co firmly believes that the various applications of AI that we see around us today are just like any other technological advancement, only better. Artificial Intelligence has only helped us in improving the quality of life while achieving unprecedented levels of automation and leaving us amazed at our own achievements at the same time. The Computer Vision mission has only just begun.