Tag Archive : data

/ data

8 resources to get free training data for ml systems

The current technological landscape has exhibited the need for feeding Machine Learning systems with useful training data sets. Training data helps a program understand how to apply technology such as neural networks. This is to help it to learn and produce sophisticated results.

The accuracy and relevance of these sets pertaining to the ML system they are being fed into are of paramount importance, for that dictates the success of the final model. For example, if a customer service chatbot is to be created which responds courteously to user complaints and queries, its competency will be highly determined by the relevancy of the training data sets given to it.

To facilitate the quest for reliable training data sets, here is a list of resources which are available free of cost.

Kaggle

Owned by Google LLC, Kaggle is a community of data science enthusiasts who can access and contribute to its repository of code and data sets. Its members are allowed to vote and run kernel/scripts on the available datasets. The interface allows users to raise doubts and answer queries from fellow community members. Also, collaborators can be invited for direct feedback.

The training data sets uploaded on Kaggle can be sorted using filters such as usability, new and most voted among others. Users can access more than 20,000 unique data sets on the platform.

Kaggle is also popularly known among the AI and ML communities for its machine learning competitions, Kaggle kernels, public datasets platform, Kaggle learn and jobs board.

Examples of training datasets found here include Satellite Photograph Order and Manufacturing Process Failures.

Registry of Open Data on AWS

As its website displays, Amazon Web Services allows its users to share any volume of data with as many people they’d like to. A subsidiary of Amazon, it allows users to analyze and build services on top of data which has been shared on it.  The training data can be accessed by visiting the Registry for Open Data on AWS.

Each training dataset search result is accompanied by a list of examples wherein the data could be used, thus deepening the user’s understanding of the set’s capabilities.

The platform emphasizes the fact that sharing data in the cloud platform allows the community to spend more time analyzing data rather than searching for it.

Examples of training datasets found here include Landsat Images and Common Crawl Corpus.

UCI Machine Learning Repository

Run by the School of Information & Computer Science, UC Irvine, this repository contains a vast collection of ML system needs such as databases, domain theories, and data generators. Based on the type of machine learning problem, the datasets have been classified. The repository has also been observed to have some ready to use data sets which have already been cleaned.

While searching for suitable training data sets, the user can browse through titles such as default task, attribute type, and area among others. These titles allow the user to explore a variety of options regarding the type of training data sets which would suit their ML models best.

The UCI Machine Learning Repository allows users to go through the catalog in the repository along with datasets outside it.

Examples of training data sets found here include Email Spam and Wine Classification.

Microsoft Research Open Data

The purpose of this platform is to promote the collaboration of data scientists all over the world. A collaboration between multiple teams at Microsoft, it provides an opportunity for exchanging training data sets and a culture of collaboration and research.

The interface allows users to select datasets under categories such as Computer Science, Biology, Social Science, Information Science, etc. The available file types are also mentioned along with details of their licensing.

Datasets spanning from Microsoft Research to advance state of the art research under domain-specific sciences can be accessed in this platform.

GitHub.com/awesomedata/awesomepublicdatasets

GitHub is a community of software developers who apart from many things can access free datasets. Companies like Buzzfeed are also known to have uploaded data sets on federal surveillance planes, zika virus, etc. Being an open-source platform, it allows users to contribute and learn about training data sets and the ones most suitable for their AI/ML models.

Socrata Open Data

This portal contains a vast variety of data sets which can be viewed on its platform and downloaded. Users will have to sort through data which is currently valid and clean to find the most useful ones. The platform allows the data to be viewed in a tabular form. This added with its built-in visualization tools makes the training data in the platform easy to retrieve and study.

Examples of sets found in this platform include White House Staff Salaries and Workplace Fatalities by US State.

R/datasets

This subreddit is dedicated to sharing training datasets which could be of interest to multiple community members. Since these are uploaded by everyday users, the quality and consistency of the training sets could vary, but the useful ones can be easily filtered out.

Examples of training datasets found in this subreddit include New York City Property Tax Data and Jeopardy Questions.

Academic Torrents

This is basically a data aggregator in which training data from scientific papers can be accessed. The training data sets found here are in many cases massive and they can be accessed directly on the site. If the user has a BitTorrent client, they can download any available training data set immediately.

Examples of available training data sets include Enron Emails and Student Learning Factors.

Conclusion

In an age where data is arguably the world’s most valuable resource, the number of platforms which provide this is also vast. Each platform caters to its own niche within the field while also displaying commonly sought after datasets.  While the quality of training data sets could vary across the board, with the appropriate filters, users can access and download the data sets which suit their machine learning models best. If you need a custom dataset, do check us out here, share your requirements with us, and we’ll more than happy to help you out!

The need for training data in ai and ml models

Not very long ago, sometime towards the end of the first decade of the 21st century, internet users everywhere around the world began seeing fidelity tests while logging onto websites. You were shown an image of a text, with one word or usually two, and you had to type the words correctly to be able to proceed further. This was their way of identifying that you were, in fact, human, and not a line of code trying to worm its way through to extract sensitive information from said website. While it was true, this wasn’t the whole story.

Turns out, only one of the two Captcha words shown to you were part of the test, and the other was an image of a word taken from an as yet non-transcribed book. And you, along with millions of unsuspecting users worldwide, contributed to the digitization of the entire Google Books archive by 2011. Another use case of such an endeavor was to train AI in Optical Character Recognition (OCR), the result of which is today’s Google Lens, besides other products.

Do you really need millions of users to build an AI? How exactly was all this transcribed data used to make a machine understand paragraphs, lines, and individual words? And what about companies that are not as big as Google – can they dream of building their own smart bot? This article will answer all these questions by explaining the role of datasets in artificial intelligence and machine learning.

ML and AI – smart tools to build smarter computers

In our efforts to make computers intelligent – teach them to find answers to problems without being explicitly programmed for every single need – we had to learn new computational techniques. They were already well endowed with multiple superhuman abilities: computers were superior calculators, so we taught them how to do math; we taught them language, and they were able to spell and even say “dog”; they were huge reservoirs of memory, hence we used them to store gigabytes of documents, pictures, and video; we created GPUs and they let us manipulate visual graphics in games and movies. What we wanted now was for the computer to help us spot a dog in a picture full of animals, go through its memory to identify and label the particular breed among thousands of possibilities, and finally morph the dog to give it the head of a lion that I captured on my last safari. This isn’t an exaggerated reality – FaceApp today shows you an older version of yourself by going through more or less the same steps.

For this, we needed to develop better programs that would let them learn how to find answers and not just be glorified calculators – the beginning of artificial intelligence. This need gave rise to several models in Machine Learning, which can be understood as tools that enhanced computers into thinking systems (loosely).

Machine Learning Models

Machine Learning is a field which explores the development of algorithms that can learn from data and then use that learning to predict outcomes. There are primarily three categories that ML models are divided into:

Supervised Learning

These algorithms are provided data as example inputs and desired outputs. The goal is to generate a function that maps the inputs to outputs with the most optimal settings that result in the highest accuracy.

Unsupervised Learning

There are no desired outputs. The model is programmed to identify its own structure in the given input data.

Reinforcement Learning

The algorithm is given a goal or target condition to meet and it is left to its devices to learn by trial and error. It uses past results to inform itself about both optimal and detrimental paths and charts the best path to the desired endgame result.

In each of these philosophies, the algorithm is designed for a generic learning process and exposed to data or a problem. In essence, the written program only teaches a wholesome approach to the problem and the algorithm learns the best way to solve it.

Based on the kind of problem-solving approach, we have the following major machine learning models being used today:

  • Regression
    These are statistical models applicable to numeric data to find out a relationship between the given input and desired output. They fall under supervised machine learning. The model tries to find coefficients that best fit the relationship between the two varying conditions. Success is defined by having as little noise and redundancy in the output as possible.

    Examples: Linear regression, polynomial regression, etc.
  • Classification
    These models predict or explain one outcome among a few possible class values. They are another type of supervised ML model. Essentially, they classify the given data as belonging to one type or ending up as one output.

    Examples: Logistic regression, decision trees, random forests, etc.
  • Decision Trees and Random Forests
    A decision tree is based on numerous binary nodes with a Yes/No decision marker at each. Random forests are made of decision trees, where accurate outputs are obtained by processing multiple decision trees and results combined.
  • Naïve Bayes Classifiers
    These are a family of probabilistic classifiers that use Bayes’ theorem in the decision rule. The input features are assumed to be independent, hence the name naïve. The model is highly scalable and competitive when compared to advanced models.
  • Clustering
    Clustering models are a part of unsupervised machine learning. They are not given any desired output but identify clusters or groups based on shared characteristics. Usually, the output is verified using visualizations.

    Examples: K-means, DBSCAN, mean shift clustering, etc.
  • Dimensionality Reduction
    In these models, the algorithm identifies the least important data from the given set. Based on the required output criteria, some information is labeled redundant or unimportant for the desired analysis. For huge datasets, this is an invaluable ability to have a manageable analysis size.

    Examples: Principal component analysis, t-stochastic neighbor embedding, etc.
  • Neural Networks and Deep Learning
    One of the most widely used models in AI and ML today, neural networks are designed to capture numerous patterns in the input dataset. This is achieved by imitating the neural structure of the human brain, with each node representing a neuron. Every node is given activation functions with weights that determine its interaction with its neighbors and adjusted with each calculation. The model has an input layer, hidden layers with neurons, and an output layer. It is called deep learning when many hidden layers are encapsulating a wide variety of architectures that can be implemented. ML using deep neural networks requires a lot of data and high computational power. The results are without a doubt the most accurate, and they have been very successful in processing images, language, audio, and videos.

There is no single ML model that offers solutions to all AI requirements. Each problem has its own distinct challenges, and knowledge of the workings behind each model is mandatory to be able to use them efficiently. For example, regression models are best suited for forecasting data and for risk assessment. Clustering modes in handwriting recognition and image recognition, decision trees to understand patterns and identify disease trends, naïve Bayes classifier for sentiment analysis, ranking websites and documents, deep neural networks models in computer vision, natural language processing, and financial markets, etc. are more such use cases.

The need for training data in ML models

Any machine learning model that we choose needs data to train its algorithm on. Without training data, all the algorithm understands is how to approach the given problem, and without proper calibration, so to speak, the results won’t be accurate enough. Before training, the model is just a theorist, without the fine-tuning to its settings necessary to start working as a usable tool.

While using datasets to teach the model, training data needs to be of a large size and high quality. All of AI’s learning happens only through this data. So it makes sense to have as big a dataset as is required to include variety, subtlety, and nuance that makes the model viable for practical use. Simple models designed to solve straight-forward problems might not require a humongous dataset, but most deep learning algorithms have their architecture coded to facilitate a deep simulation of real-world features.

The other major factor to consider while building or using training data is the quality of labeling or annotation. If you’re trying to teach a bot to speak the human language or write in it, it’s not just enough to have millions of lines of dialogue or script. What really makes the difference is readability, accurate meaning, effective use of language, recall, etc. Similarly, if you are building a system to identify emotion from facial images, the training data needs to have high accuracy in labeling corners of eyes and eyebrows, edges of the mouth, the tip of the nose and textures for facial muscles. High-quality training data also makes it faster to train your model accurately. Required volumes can be significantly reduced, saving time, effort (more on this shortly) and money.

Datasets are also used to test the results of training. Model predictions are compared to testing data values to determine the accuracy achieved until then. Datasets are quite central to building AI – your model is only as good as the quality of your training data.

How to build datasets?

With heavy requirements in quantity and quality, it is clear that getting your hands on reliable datasets is not an easy task. You need bespoke datasets that match your exact requirements. The best training data is tailored for the complexity of the ask as opposed to being the best-fit choice from a list of options. Being able to build a completely adaptive and curated dataset is invaluable for businesses developing artificial intelligence.

On the contrary, having a repository of several generic datasets is more beneficial for a business selling training data. There are also plenty of open-source datasets available online for different categories of training data. MNIST, ImageNet, CIFAR provide images. For text datasets, one can use WordNet, WikiText, Yelp Open Dataset, etc. Datasets for facial images, videos, sentiment analysis, graphs and networks, speech, music, and even government stats are all easily found on the web.

Another option to build datasets is to scrape websites. For example, one can take customer reviews off e-commerce websites to train classification models for sentiment analysis use cases. Images can be downloaded en masse as well. Such data needs further processing before it can be used to train ML models. You will have to clean this data to remove duplicates, or to identify unrelated or poor-quality data.

Irrespective of the method of procurement, a vigilant developer is always likely to place their bets on something personalized for their product that can address specific needs. The most ideal solutions are those that are painstakingly built from scratch with high levels of precision and accuracy with the ability to scale. The last bit cannot be underestimated – AI and ML have an equally important volume side to their success conditions.

Coming back to Google, what are they doing lately with their ingenious crowd-sourcing model? We don’t see a lot of captcha text anymore. As fidelity tests, web users are now annotating images to identify patterns and symbols. All the traffic lights, trucks, buses and road crossings that you mark today are innocuously building training data to develop their latest tech for self-driving cars. The question is, what’s next for AI and how can we leverage human effort that is central to realizing machine intelligence through training datasets?

The need for quality training data | Blog | Bridged.o

What is training data? Where to find it? And how much do you need?

Artificial Intelligence is created primarily from exposure and experience. In order to teach a computer system a certain thought-action process for executing a task, it is fed a large amount of relevant data which, simply put, is a collection of correct examples of the desired process and result. This data is called Training Data, and the entire exercise is part of Machine Learning.

Artificial Intelligence tasks are more than just computing and storage or doing them faster and more efficiently. We said thought-action process because that is precisely what the computer is trying to learn: given basic parameters and objectives, it can understand rules, establish relationships, detect patterns, evaluate consequences, and identify the best course of action. But the success of the AI model depends on the quality, accuracy, and quantity of the training data that it feeds on.

The training data itself needs to be tailored for the end-result desired. This is where Bridged excels in delivering the best training data. Not only do we provide highly accurate datasets, but we also curate it as per the requirements of the project.

Below are a few examples of training data labeling that we provide to train different types of machine learning models:

2D/3D Bounding Boxes

2D/3D bounding boxed | Blog | Bridged.co

Drawing rectangles or cuboids around objects in an image and labeling them to different classes.

Point Annotation

Point annotation | Blog | Bridged.co

Marking points of interest in an object to define its identifiable features.

Line Annotation

Line annotation | Blog | Bridged.co

Drawing lines over objects and assigning a class to them.

Polygonal Annotation

Polygonal annotation | Blog | Bridged.co

Drawing polygonal boundaries around objects and class-labeling them accordingly.

Semantic Segmentation

Semantic segmentation | Blog | Bridged.co

Labeling images at a pixel level for a greater understanding and classification of objects.

Video Annotation

Video annotation | Blog | Bridged.co

Object tracking through multiple frames to estimate both spatial and temporal quantities.

Chatbot Training

Chatbot training | Blog | Bridged.co

Building conversation sets, labeling different parts of speech, tone and syntax analysis.

Sentiment Analysis

Sentiment analysis | Blog | Bridged.co

Label user content to understand brand sentiment: positive, negative, neutral and the reasons why.

Data Management

Cleaning, structuring, and enriching data for increased efficiency in processing.

Image Tagging

Image tagging | Blog | Bridged.co

Identify scenes and emotions. Understand apparel and colours.

Content Moderation

Content moderation | Blog | Bridged.co

Label text, images, and videos to evaluate permissible and inappropriate material.

E-commerce Recommendations

Optimise product recommendations for up-sell and cross-sell.

Optical Character Recognition

Learn to convert text from images into machine-readable data.


How much training data does an AI model need?

The amount of training data one needs depends on several factors — the task you are trying to perform, the performance you want to achieve, the input features you have, the noise in the training data, the noise in your extracted features, the complexity of your model and so on. Although, as an unspoken rule, machine learning enthusiasts understand that larger the dataset, more fine-tuned the AI model will turn out to be.

Validation and Testing

After the model is fit using training data, it goes through evaluation steps to achieve the required accuracy.

Validation & testing of models | Blog | Bridged.co

Validation Dataset

This is the sample of data that is used to provide an unbiased evaluation of the model fit on the training dataset while tuning model hyper-parameters. The evaluation becomes more biased when the validation dataset is incorporated into the model configuration.

Test Dataset

In order to test the performance of models, they need to be challenged frequently. The test dataset provides an unbiased evaluation of the final model. The data in the test dataset is never used during training.

Importance of choosing the right training datasets

Considering the success or failure of the AI algorithm depends so much on the training data it learns from, building a quality dataset is of paramount importance. While there are public platforms for different sorts of training data, it is not prudent to use them for more than just generic purposes. With curated and carefully constructed training data, the likes of which are provided by Bridged, machine learning models can quickly and accurately scale toward their desired goals.

Reach out to us at www.bridgedai.com to build quality data catering to your unique requirements.